New! Mainlandizations de l’heure

The management have announced that Mainlandizations du jour are being phased out in favour of Mainlandizations de l’heure. And pre-emptive kowtows will henceforth be pre-emptive repressions. 

Hong Kong’s public libraries suspend loans of books by Joshua Wong and Tanya Chan in case the works are subversive. Special librarian sniffer-dogs are nosing through the pages as we speak in search of prohibited thoughts. The HK Police – who make Cultural and Leisure Services look amazingly subtle – have arrested a teenager for possession of stickers that might threaten national security by bearing the word ‘conscience’, a passage from the Bible, a cartoon of Xi-as-coronavirus and – weirdest of all – a quote by Chris Patten.

Meanwhile, the Hong Kong government issues a ‘solemn’ statement on the slogan 光復香港, 時代革命. Protesters’ flags usually bear the translation ‘Liberate HK – revolution of our times’. The official release does not explicitly say it is an offense to use the slogan, just that it ‘connotes’ vaguely defined illegal acts. The second paragraph condemning law-breaking and reminding you to obey the law does not actually follow on from the first, though you are supposed to infer that it does. (The cops’ warnings use this trick.) 

Teresa Cheng warns against using the slogan, as does poor Matthew Cheung.

This is an invitation to broadcast it even more. It obviously infuriates someone up there. (It goes back not just to Edward Leung but the anti-Qing movement.) My local scribblers waste no time in adorning our neighbourhood protest palimpsest zone. Rebels are creating Rhyming, punning or coded versions of it. The more you try to ban the words, the more you’ll see them.

A thread from Christopher DeWolf on how a HK graffiti artist – and the media covering her story – would be treated today with the NatSec Law.

A fetching Winnie vs bees cartoon.

And remember those jokes about how New Zealand has more sheep than people? Now it seems to have more CCP United Front creepos than sheep.

This just in: Orwellian has been cancelled; from now on, things are Kafkaesque.

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10 Responses to New! Mainlandizations de l’heure

  1. A Poor Man says:

    Poor Mathew Cheung? How many properties did he and his wife declare? I seem to remember it was 9 or so.

  2. Chinese Netizen says:

    Congratulations CCP/HKCCPSAR “government”: You’ve now fomented the seeds for a real insurgency as well as created future insurgents by terrorizing mere children and allowing knuckle dragging, minimally educated street popo to interpret what’s “good” versus “bad” in their zeal to show daddy how diligent they are at their jobs and to collect xidada points for being obedient little thugs.

    I only hope when the masses start considering emigrating, the inviting nations properly vet to ensure the likes of the Fujian Benevolent Societies/Gov’t Triads/and other assorted UF slime don’t squeak through as well…

  3. Onecistern says:

    There are many things which could be liberated…Liberate Hong Kong from Illegal Parking stickers would go down a treat.

  4. Roddy the Rodomontade says:

    Describing a situation as “Kafkaesque” is a cliche much overused, usually by people who haven’t read a word of Kafka’s books. (I’m not implying you, Hemmers, or anyone who reads your blog.) But people familiar with Kafka’s work will know his short stories and novellas are humorous, erotic, deliciously confusing (for K and the reader) and, often, unfinished.

    A more appropriate adjective for the present situation in Hong Kong might be “cuntish”.

  5. Hamantha says:

    How long will it be until the National Security Law results in…

    -Foreign media correspondents and reporters expelled en masse?
    -Censorship of a huge swath of websites, platforms, apps, and books?
    -Mandatory registration of all telecommunication devices and services via registered ID documents?
    -Stringent social media checks for all immigrants, and/or non-Chinese who wish to enter, work, or live in Hong Kong, and disqualifications for anyone with “wrong opinions”?
    -Barring Hong Kong residents from transferring money and property out of the Motherland, and/or leaving the city if suspected of fleeing to other countries?
    -Concentration and work camps for political dissidents?H

  6. Low Profile says:

    “Liberate Hong Kongt from violence” would be a good slogan. To us, it means disband the police; to them, it means crush the violent protesters.

  7. Where's my jet plane says:

    A question: Does the common or garden Mr Plod get the authority to use the unrestricted entry and search powers included in the NIL simply by whispering the magic words? Or is the privilege restricted to the Guestpo squad?

  8. Mark Bradley says:

    “Describing a situation as “Kafkaesque” is a cliche much overused, usually by people who haven’t read a word of Kafka’s books. (I’m not implying you, Hemmers, or anyone who reads your blog.) But people familiar with Kafka’s work will know his short stories and novellas are humorous, erotic, deliciously confusing (for K and the reader) and, often, unfinished.”

    But in this case Kafkaesque is the perfect fit; “The Trial” and “In the Penal Colony.” immediately come to mind and both have the same sort of fever dream-like illogical quality that is now our new reality.

  9. Where's my jet plane says:

    The party chief’s committee has answered my question via the SCMP. Rather worrying. I’m sure the mercenary Mr D will be pleased.

  10. Toph says:

    @jet plane: Regular police can do warrantless searches.

    @Onecistern: it won’t matter what slogan people use, they arrested people yesterday for holding up blank paper.

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